Loading Events

« All Events

  • This event has passed.

05-Oct-2023-Daily-Current-Affairs

October 5, 2023 @ 7:30 am - 11:30 pm

CENTRE AIMS TO TRIPLE PALM OIL OUTPUT BY 2030

GS 3 (ECONOMY): SOURCE – FINANCIAL EXPRESS

Introduction:

The Indian government aims to significantly increase domestic palm oil production under the National Oil Palm Mission, targeting a production level of 1 million tonnes (MT) by 2030. To achieve this goal, the government and industry stakeholders are actively working on expanding palm plantation areas.

Key Points:

  1. Increasing Palm Oil Production:
  • Current palm oil production stands at 0.35 MT.
  • The target is to reach 1 MT by 2030.
  • This ambitious goal will require consistent efforts over the next decade.

  1. Annual Expansion Plans:
  • The plan involves adding at least 0.1 million hectares (MH) of new palm plantation each year.
  • In FY23, 42,000 hectares of new plantation were added.
  • In the current fiscal year, approximately 70,000 hectares of plantation are expected to be added.
  • By FY25, an additional 0.1 MH of plantation is anticipated.
  1. Industry Involvement:
  • Multiple companies, including Godrej Agrovet, Patanjali Food, and 3F Oil Palm Agrotech Industries, are working on increasing the total palm plantation area.
  • Godrej Agrovet alone owns a third of the total palm plantation in the country.
  1. Rising Edible Oil Consumption:
  • Domestic consumption of edible oil is projected to increase from 24 MT to 30 MT by 2030.
  • Even with increased production, India will continue to rely on imports due to rising demand.
  1. Import Dependency:
  • Currently, India imports around 14 MT of edible oil.
  • Imports are expected to reach a record 17 MT in the current oil year, driven by falling global prices of palm, soybean, and sunflower oil.
  • Major imports include 8 MT of palm oil from Indonesia and Malaysia, as well as other oils from countries like Argentina, Brazil, Ukraine, and Russia.
  1. National Oil Palm Mission:

Launched in August 2021 with an investment of Rs 11,040 crore.

The central government contributes Rs 8,844 crore, while the rest is provided by state governments for viability gap funding and financial assistance for planting material.

  1. Focus on Specific States:
  • The strategy involves expanding palm plantation areas in states like Andhra Pradesh, Telangana, Assam, Tripura, and Mizoram.
  • Andhra Pradesh, Telangana, and Kerala account for 98% of total palm oil production in India.
  • Other oils like mustard (40%), soybean (24%), and groundnut (7%) also contribute to domestic production
  • These regions are seen as key contributors to boosting domestic output and reducing import dependence.

Conclusion:

India’s ambitious target of increasing palm oil production to 1 MT by 2030 under the National Oil Palm Mission requires sustained efforts, industry investments, and expansion in key states. While progress is being made, rising edible oil consumption ensures that import dependency will continue to be a significant aspect of India’s edible oil market.

COUNTRIES PLEDGE TO RAISE $12 BILLION TO FUND CORAL REEF PROTECTION

GS 3 (ENVIRONMENT): SOURCE – THE ECONOMIC TIMES)

Introduction:

An alliance of nations has committed to raising $12 billion to protect coral reefs, aiming to address threats such as pollution and overfishing. The International Coral Reef Initiative (ICRI) leads this initiative, emphasizing the urgent need to conserve and restore coral ecosystems, which support a significant portion of the world’s marine life and over a billion people. However, experts caution that addressing broader climate-related risks is essential alongside this funding effort.

Key Points:

  1. Threats to Coral Reefs:
  • Coral reefs face multiple threats, including pollution, overfishing, marine pollution, coastal development, and fishing activities.
  • Rising sea temperatures, linked to climate change, lead to coral bleaching, endangering these ecosystems further
  1. Climate Crisis Impact:
  • While additional funding for coral reef protection and restoration is welcomed, experts emphasize that addressing rising temperatures due to the climate crisis is a more significant risk.
  • Coral bleaching, caused by higher sea temperatures, poses a severe threat.
  • Upcoming climate events like El Niño are expected to exacerbate coral bleaching.
  1. ICRI’s Objectives:
  • The ICRI aims to safeguard 125,000 square kilometres of shallow-water tropical coral reefs and double the areas under effective protection by the end of the decade.
  • The initiative also pledges to accelerate the restoration of damaged reefs through innovative solutions.
  1. Challenges of Restoration:
  • large-scale restoration of coral reefs could be prohibitively expensive.
  • Restoration alone may not suffice to address the complex challenges faced by coral ecosystems.

International coral reef initiative:

  • It is a global partnership between Nations and organizations which strives to preserve coral reefs and related ecosystems around world.
  • ICRI was established in 1994 by several countries, including Australia, France, Japan, Jamaica, the Philippines, Sweden, Britain, and the United States.
  • Currently, it comprises 45 member countries, representing a substantial portion of the world’s coral reefs.

Conclusion:

The commitment of $12 billion to protect coral reefs is a commendable effort, recognizing the urgency of preserving these critical ecosystems. However, while restoration is essential, addressing the root cause of coral reef threats, including climate change and rising sea temperatures, remains paramount. The need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions should be a central focus alongside these preservation efforts.

THE ROLLER-COASTER THAT WAS THE 2023 MONSOON

GS 1 (GEOGRAPHY): SOURCE – THE HINDU

Erratic Monsoon Season:

  • The official 2023 Southwest Monsoon season, spanning from June to September, displayed erratic rainfall trends.
  • It began with a severe rainfall deficit in early June, transitioned to surplus rainfall in July causing floods in several northern states, followed by an extraordinarily dry August (the driest since 1901).
  • Record-breaking September rains compensated for earlier deficits, resulting in an overall “normal” monsoon.

Influence of El Nino and IOD:

  • The India Meteorological Department (IMD) attributed deficient rainfall days during the season to El Nino, a climate pattern linked to below-normal monsoon rainfall due to warming sea surface temperatures in the Pacific.
  • Surplus rainfall, especially in September, was credited to the positive Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD), characterized by temperature differences in the western and eastern Indian Ocean.

Conclusion:

The 2023 Southwest Monsoon season showcased its unpredictability, influenced by El Nino and the IOD. While these factors played significant roles, other regional and global atmospheric patterns, like Eurasian snow cover, also affected the monsoon. Understanding these complexities is vital for forecasting and managing India’s monsoon-related challenges.

LPG SUBSIDY FOR UJJWALA BENEFICIARIES RAISED TO ₹300

GS 2 (POLITY AND GOVERNANCE): SOURCE – THE HINDU

  • The Union Cabinet has approved an increase in the subsidy provided on LPG cylinders under the Ujjwala scheme ahead of the Assembly elections in five states.
  • The subsidy on a 14.2-kg cylinder under the Ujjwala scheme has been raised from ₹200 to ₹300 per cylinder
  • As a result, the cost of a cylinder for beneficiaries of the Ujjwala scheme will now be ₹603, down from the previous ₹703.
  • This decision is expected to benefit 9.6 crore families across India.
  • The Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs (CCEA) approved the subsidy increase for up to 12 refills per year.
  • The subsidy increase aims to provide relief to households and comes in the run-up to Assembly elections in Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, Telangana, Chhattisgarh, and Mizoram.

NANOPARTICLES FROM VEHICLE FUMES CAN CAUSE ACUTE ILLNESS

GS 3 (ENVIRONMENT): SOURCE – THE INDIAN EXPRESS

  • A recent study conducted by researchers has investigated the presence of nanoparticles in Delhi’s air and their potential impact on human health.
  • Nanoparticles: Nanoparticles, which range in size from 10 to 1090 nanometers, can originate from various sources, including natural processes and human activities. In urban environments, vehicular emissions are a major contributor to nanoparticle pollution.

Health Implications:

  • These ultrafine particles can penetrate deep into the respiratory system, and in urban environments, they can contribute significantly to the total particle concentration.
  • Additionally, meteorological factors such as relative humidity, wind speed, and time of day can influence the concentration and dispersion of nanoparticles.
  • Nanoparticles in the nano-size range have the potential to be transported to various parts of the body, potentially leading to chronic and acute illnesses.

SAMPRITI-XI

GS 3 (SECURITY): SOURCE- THE HINDU

  • India and Bangladesh began a two-week military exercise in Meghalaya’s Umroi on Tuesday with an aim to share tactical drills and promote best practices in carrying out sub-conventional operations.
  • The exercise — “SAMPRITI-XI” — promises to further enhance the defence cooperation between India and Bangladesh, fostering deeper bilateral relations, cultural understanding and mutual benefits from shared experiences,
  • “This exercise, alternatingly organised by both countries, signifies strong bilateral defence cooperation initiatives. With its inception in Jorhat, Assam in 2009, the exercise has witnessed 10 successful editions till 2022,”

INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT

GS 2 (INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS): SOURCE – THE INDIAN EXPRESS

  • Armenia votes to join International Criminal Court
  • International Criminal Court is permanent judicial body established by the Rome Statuteof the International Criminal Court (1998).
  • It investigates, prosecutes, and try individuals accused of genocidewar crimes, and crimes against humanity and to impose prison sentences upon individuals who are found guilty of such crimes.
  • On July 1, 2002, after the requisite number of countries (60) ratified the agreement, the courtbegan sittings. It is headquartered in the Netherlands at The Hague

Details

Date:
October 5, 2023
Time:
7:30 am - 11:30 pm
Event Category: