Loading Events

« All Events

  • This event has passed.

10-January-2024-Daily-Current-Affairs

January 10 @ 7:00 am - 11:30 pm

TWO TIGER DEATHS REPORTED IN TWO DAYS IN TELANGANA

GS 3 (ENVIRONMENT): SOURCE – THE HINDU

In Telangana’s Kumram Bheem Asifabad district, two tiger deaths within two days raise concerns of potential poisoning through bait.

                  

  • Initially attributed to territorial fights, the first carcass, a sub-adult female tiger, was discovered on Saturday.
  • The second carcass, a five to six-year-old male tiger, was found on Monday, prompting wildlife conservation activists to dismiss territorial disputes as uncommon among females.
  • Suspicions arise regarding possible retaliation by villagers for recent cattle kills, despite official compensation efforts.
  • The Forest Department’s preliminary investigation suggests poisoning as the likely cause of the male tiger’s death.

REGULATION BY STATUTE DOES NOT ROB A VARSITY OF MINORITY STATUS: JUSTICE CHANDRACHUD

GS 2 (POLITY AND GOVERNANCE): SOURCE – THE HINDU

A recent observation by a seven-judge Bench, led by Chief Justice of India D.Y. Chandrachud, emphasized that the regulation of an educational institution by statute does not strip it of minority status. This statement holds significance in the context of the constitutional right (Article 30) granting minorities the freedom to establish and administer educational institutions.

Key Points:

  • Statutory Regulation and Minority Status: The court clarified that being governed by a statute does not negate an institution’s minority status.
  • Diverse Courses and Secular Administration: Article 30 doesn’t mandate religious courses or exclusive administration by a minority community. Secular administration and admission of students from any community are permissible.
  • Aligarh Muslim University Case: The observation was made during the hearing of a case related to the minority status of Aligarh Muslim University.
  • Role of Private and Minority Institutions: Emphasizing the crucial role of private and minority institutions in India’s education system, the court highlighted that standards and curricula are regulated by the State for all universities.

Conclusion:

The court’s stance underscores the inclusive nature of minority educational institutions, allowing for diversity in courses and administration. It clarifies that adherence to statutory regulations does not compromise their minority status, promoting constitutional principles of diversity and educational autonomy.

RAPID RISE IN WEB BLOCKING ORDERS, SHOWS RTI REPLY

GS 2 (POLITY): SOURCE – THE HINDU

A significant surge in website blocking orders, exceeding a 100-fold increase from 2013 to October 2023, has been revealed through a Right to Information (RTI) reply. The data, obtained by activist Kanhaiya Kumar, indicates a rise from 62 orders in 2013 to 6,954 orders by October 2023 under Section 69A of the Information Technology Act.

           

Key Points:

  • Remarkable Growth: The blocking orders witnessed an extraordinary growth, coinciding with a substantial rise in Internet usage, particularly following a drastic reduction in mobile data prices in 2016.
  • Telecom Department’s Directive: In December, the Department of Telecommunications (DoT) instructed Internet service providers to compile Indian server IP addresses, aiming for swift blocking. This move aligns with the escalating blocking orders.
  • Confidentiality Concerns: The IT Ministry declined to disclose a detailed breakdown of statistics, citing confidentiality clauses. The blocking orders primarily target individual posts, videos, or profiles.
  • Legal Framework: Section 69A empowers the Union government to block online content in the interest of India’s sovereignty, integrity, defense, security, foreign relations, public order, or to prevent incitement to cognizable offenses.

Conclusion:

The surge in website blocking orders underscores the government’s active regulation of online content. As Internet usage continues to rise, balancing legal frameworks with privacy concerns becomes crucial. The evolving landscape of encryption technologies poses challenges, prompting considerations for collaborative approaches with content delivery networks for effective implementation. The delicate balance between ensuring security and respecting individual rights remains a pertinent aspect of this evolving digital scenario.

COULD SISAL LEAVES MAKE SANITARY NAPKINS MORE SUSTAINABLE IN INDIA?

GS 3 (SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY): SOURCE – THE HINDU

A groundbreaking study led by a team from Stanford University, spearheaded by Professor Manu Prakash, reveals a sustainable alternative for menstrual hygiene products. Utilizing sisal leaves, the researchers developed a highly absorbent material that could substitute cotton, wood pulp, and chemical absorbents in sanitary napkins. This innovation addresses environmental concerns associated with conventional materials, offering a potential eco-friendly solution.

        

Key Points:

  • Sisal’s Versatility: Sisal leaves, historically used by Aztec and Mayan civilizations for paper-making, prove versatile. The stiff, green leaves are now explored for their potential in producing absorbent materials for sanitary napkins.
  • Sustainable Production: The research presents a method devoid of polluting chemicals, aiming for local, small-scale, and environmentally sustainable production. The absorbent material’s capacity surpasses commercial menstrual pads.
  • Growing Demand: As hygienic menstrual practices gain traction globally, especially in India, where the Centre for Economic Data reported increased usage, the demand for sustainable and cost-effective products rises.
  • Environmental Concerns: Traditional sanitary napkins contribute to non-biodegradable waste and environmental hazards. The proposed sisal-based alternative aims to mitigate these concerns.
  • Water-Efficient Cultivation: Sisal’s water-efficient cultivation presents a significant advantage, with Dr. Prakash highlighting a substantial difference in water use between sisal and cotton cultivation.
  • Innovative Delignification: The study’s unique approach involves delignification inspired by termite guts, utilizing peroxyformic acid. This process selectively removes lignin without toxic by-products, contributing to environmental sustainability.
  • Global Collaboration: The team plans a global initiative involving high school students to test the process on various plants. The aim is to create a public database, fostering diverse solutions tailored to different geographical regions.
  • Distributed Manufacturing: The research advocates for distributed manufacturing, emphasizing local production to cater to specific populations. This approach minimizes carbon emissions from long-distance transportation.

Challenges and Quality Assurance:

  • Gynaecologists and experts emphasize the need for robust research to ensure plant-based menstrual hygiene products meet existing quality standards.
  • Distributed quality control partnerships with organizations in Nigeria, Kenya, and Nepal aim to address concerns about the on-field performance of such products.

Conclusion:

Stanford’s innovative use of sisal leaves for sustainable menstrual hygiene products marks a crucial step towards environmentally conscious practices. The research not only introduces an eco-friendly alternative but also emphasizes global collaboration and distributed manufacturing for widespread impact. As the initiative progresses, it holds the potential to contribute significantly to the broader movement addressing period poverty and menstrual health, reflecting a holistic and inclusive approach.

PRIVATE MOON MISSION FACING A DEATH DIVE AFTER MISHAP

GS 3 (SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY): SOURCE – THE INDIAN EXPRESS

A significant setback looms for the historic private moon mission, with Astrobotic’s Peregrine Lunar Lander facing a potential mission failure due to a critical loss of fuel. This mission, attached to United Launch Alliance’s new Vulcan rocket, aimed to achieve the United States’ first robotic lunar landing in fifty years. However, technical troubles emerged, jeopardizing the mission’s success.

    

Key Points:

  • Launch and Separation: The Peregrine Lunar Lander successfully launched atop the Vulcan rocket but encountered issues post-separation from the launch vehicle.
  • Technical Troubles: Technical problems surfaced, starting with difficulties in orienting the spacecraft’s solar panel towards the Sun and maintaining the onboard battery, linked to propulsion system malfunctions.
  • Critical Loss of Propellant: Astrobotic reported a critical loss of propellant, leading to concerns about the spacecraft’s ability to maintain a controlled descent and power.
  • Imminent Uncontrollable Tumble: With approximately 40 hours of fuel left, Peregrine faced an uncontrollable tumble. Attempts to bring it close to lunar distance were underway, leaving the possibility of a crash landing.
  • Damage Evidence: An image revealed extensive damage to the spacecraft’s outer layer, providing evidence of the propulsion system anomaly.
  • Missed Lunar Landing: Peregrine was intended to orbit the moon for several weeks before attempting a lunar landing on February 23. Only a few national space agencies have achieved lunar soft landings.
  • Commercial Lunar Payload Services (CLPS): NASA, aiming for a broader lunar economy, relies on commercial entities like Astrobotic. The apparent failure raises questions about the strategy’s effectiveness.
  • Financial Investment: NASA invested over $100 million in Astrobotic for this mission, emphasizing the importance of private-sector partnerships in the Artemis program’s lunar exploration efforts.

Conclusion:

The potential failure of Astrobotic’s Peregrine Lunar Lander underscores the challenges and risks associated with lunar exploration. As the U.S. embraces commercial partnerships to advance lunar ambitions, setbacks like this prompt reflections on the viability of such strategies. The outcome could impact NASA’s approach to leveraging private enterprises for future lunar missions under the Commercial Lunar Payload Services program.

 

ONGC STARTS OIL PRODUCTION FROM ITS FLAGSHIP DEEP-SEA PROJECT IN KRISHNA-GODAVARI BASIN

GS 1 (GEOGRAPHY): SOURCE – INDIAN EXPRESS

ONGC has commenced oil production from its Cluster-2 project in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, marking a significant development in offshore drilling. Offshore drilling involves extracting petroleum from reserves beneath the ocean floor, utilizing floating rigs for deep waters and bottom-resting platforms for shallow waters.

Key Points:

Offshore Drilling Techniques:

  • Floating Rigs: Employed for drilling in deep waters.
  • Bottom-Resting Platforms: Used for drilling in shallow waters.

Significance of Offshore Drilling for India:

  • Energy Security: Diversifies India’s energy sources, contributing to self-reliance amid growing energy demands.
  • Additional Benefits: Promotes technological advancements, generates employment, stimulates economic growth.

Challenges in Offshore Drilling:

  • Geological Issues: Subsurface complexities pose challenges.
  • Environmental Concerns: Risks include oil contamination to marine life, greenhouse gas emissions, impacting coastal communities.

Sedimentary Basins in India:

  • India features 26 sedimentary basins, broadly categorized into three types.
  • These basins play a pivotal role in oil exploration and production activities.

Conclusion:

ONGC’s initiation of oil production from the Cluster-2 project highlights the strides in India’s offshore drilling capabilities. While offshore drilling contributes significantly to energy security and economic growth, it necessitates addressing geological and environmental challenges. The sedimentary basins across India serve as crucial zones for oil exploration, emphasizing the nation’s commitment to diversifying its energy portfolio and achieving self-sufficiency in meeting energy demands.

DIRECTORATE GENERAL OF CIVIL AVIATION (DGCA)

GS 2 (POLITY AND GOVERNANCE): SOURCE – INDIAN EXPRESS

The Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) has revised Flight Duty Time Limitations (FDTL) regulations for flight crew, aligning them with international standards to address pilot fatigue and enhance overall flight safety.

  • As an attached office of the Ministry of Civil Aviation, DGCA’s responsibilities encompass regulating air transport services to, from, and within India, enforcing civil air regulations, ensuring air safety, and coordinating regulatory functions with the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO).
  • These updates reflect a commitment to global best practices and the continuous improvement of aviation safety measures in India.

Details

Date:
January 10
Time:
7:00 am - 11:30 pm
Event Category: